Yerba Buena Neighborhood Earthquake Preparedness Program



Yerba Buena Neighborhood Earthquake Preparedness Program

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section Contents
i. Introduction
ii. Overview
I. Preparation
II. Community Coordination and Response
III. Coordination with Government Services
IV. Outreach and Training
V. Food and Water
VI. Shelter
VII. First Aid
VIII. Vulnerable Populations/Agency Protocols
IX. Security and Sanitation
X. Advocacy
XI. Emergency Operations Center
XII. Appendices



INTRODUCTION

The Loma Prieta Earthquake of October 17, 1989, painted a vivid picture of what the future may have in store for San Francisco communities. The earthquake that struck the San Francisco Bay Region at 5:04 P.M. was expected and the outcome was avoidable.

In the aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, cities of the Bay Region rebuilt using debris and technology of the 19th century. The vulnerability built into our communities was exhibited in each successive earthquake of the twentieth century. Shortly after the Santa Barbara Earthquake of 1925, the first seismic codes were adopted in an attempt to reduce building collapse during earthquakes. Each successive earthquake brought changes and improvements in the way we built new structures. Unfortunately, the years also brought us an ever increasing inventory of older structures built without the benefit of seismic resistance or built to early building codes we now know are inadequate.

In October 1989, antiquated structures of unreinforced masonry and non-ductile concrete took a devastating toll in life and injury. The loss of inadequately braced wooden structures left thousands without shelter. In San Francisco's South of Market Neighborhood there was a lack of trained professional emergency responders so, the needs of the citizens in this community were not met. Individuals that were prepared were able to assist. This is why we place such emphasis on individual preparedness.

The Loma Prieta Earthquake retaught old lessons, the most important of which is that we can determine the outcome of future earthquakes by the actions we take before they strike. This plan describes the mitigation measures that should be taken by our community. Although some of these mitigation measures require a complex and long-term program, they are reasonable and prudent steps given the potential costs in life we now face from future earthquakes.

Transportation, communications, electric power, water and sewer, and fuel transmission facilities are the lifelines of modern American society. Failure of these facilities as the result of earthquakes is a threat taken seriously in the San Francisco Bay Area where strong earthquakes have occurred. Further, the failure of a lifeline facility can have far-reaching effects because of the interstate nature of some lifelines.

This plan attempts to mitigate the impact a major earthquake will have on our community with loss of these lifelines and city government essential services.

Due to the large number of frail and elderly in the Yerba Buena Area of San Francisco, the lack of medical services that will be available following a major disaster will have the greatest impact on our community. The first aid section of this manual addresses different level of service that will need to be provided depending on the magnitude of the earthquake and the time of day it occurs.

NOTE: It should be noted that if the event occurs during weekday work hours that the San Francisco population during this time is doubled with the greatest number of these workers in the downtown area. This will cause gridlock in the Yerba Buena area causing additional difficulties with sheltering and access to the area.

The following table attempts to identify what we will probably experience under three different scenarios with regards to lifelines, emergency services and building damage.

The table below are assumptions of what would be the expected disruptions in the Yerba Buena area only.

MODERATE (1989) SERIOUS (Hayward Fault) GREAT (1906)
Lifelines to YBC Power out up to 3 days out up to 1 week out up to 1 month
Water OK out up to 1 week out up to 1 month
Sewer OK out up to 1 month out for several months
Gas OK out up to 1 month out for several months
Street Access OK partial up to 1 week blocked up to 1 week
Emergency Services
Fire
Uncertain Unlikely None
Paramedics
OK inconsistent none for 3 days
Security
OK (Moscone) (Moscone)
Building Damage
Elevators
OK out up to 3 days out until repaired
Mechanical
OK minor repairs out until repaired
Non-Structural
Minor some significant
Fire
OK possible possible
Red Tag
NO NO possible
Yellow Tag
NO possible possible



OVERVIEW

Neighborhood preparedness is the most efficient and reliable way to prepare for and respond to a major disaster. Through a series of community meetings with residents, service providers, building managers, administrators and disaster response agencies, this plan has been developed to create a coordinated effort of response.

This plan addresses preparedness on both an individual and community level.. Each section attempts to cover needs, preparedness and response procedures and a SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN to achieve preparedness goals.

The Yerba Buena area is bordered by Market and Bryant Streets, 5th and 2nd Streets. The resident population is diverse combination of small businesses, office buildings, retail establishments and a significant number of elders and disabled persons (1800) living in seven medium rise apartment buildings. About 40% of the residents in the area are non-English speaking and abut 70% use English as a second language. Languages spoken include Cantonese, Mandarin, Russian, Spanish and Filipino languages. Approximately 15-18% of the residents are disabled. There are another (1250) residents in the Yerba Buena area that live in medium rise apartments or condominiums. These individuals range from retired to professional to part-time residents and children.

According to the San Francisco Office of Emergency Services and San Francisco Emergency Medical Services, the Yerba Buena area is contained within Battalion District #3. This designation places the San Francisco Fire Station on Bluxome Street as the area headquarters, the Moscone Center and the Potrero Hill Middle School (alternate location to Moscone) as the area shelters, and the South of Market Clinic on Minna Street and the City Clinic on 7th Street as the area First Aid Facilities. There is currently no designation or future plans according to the San Francisco Department of Public Health for a hospital in the district.

This neighborhood plan will continue to evolve with community input. Preparation can only be achieved through ongoing education, coordination and reinforcement.

This plan attempts to address response to an earthquake of a 6.5 to 8.3 magnitude. An earthquake in this range or one of a more destructive nature would render the population isolated from many or all local services. This possibility emphasizes the importance of individual preparedness.


This plan addresses each of the above aspects of disaster preparedness and response. There is a SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN at the beginning of each section containing recommendations on how to achieve preparedness goals.



I. PREPARATION

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. Facilitate individual/household preparation through periodic public meetings using available multi-lingual earthquake preparedness materials.
  2. Convene periodic community meetings to update the neighborhood plan.
  3. Convene periodic community wide and in-house drills.
  4. Encourage each agency to create and maintain an earthquake preparedness kit for use by employees.

A. Individual Preparedness
The first tier of preparedness is individual preparation. Each household/ workplace should store emergency supplies (see appendix for supplies checklist).

Promotion and facilitation of individual preparedness can be achieved by periodic public meetings with multi-lingual interpretation into languages appropriate to the client population. TODCO has produced an earthquake preparedness videotape entitled "Make Yourself A Promise: Earthquake Preparedness for Yourself and Your Community." The videotape is available in English, English open-captioned (for the hearing impaired), Cantonese, Mandarin, Russian, Spanish, Cambodian and Korean. The videotape is accompanied by a Program Guide which can be used to give a public presentation.

B. Community Meetings
Periodic community meetings will be convened by the Yerba Buena Consortium Earthquake Preparedness Task Force to work on successive drafts of this plan. The Task Force will meet quarterly or as often as necessary.

A status report on the plan is given at each monthly Yerba Buena Consortium meeting.

C. Neighborhood Preparedness
The Yerba Buena neighborhood is fortunate to have some community resources which will benefit the community at the time of an earthquake created disaster. Various support services for many residents are provided by building managers, social service personnel and by the Salvation Army. Other residents and Yerba Buena area employees have little or no support services. The two designated first aid stations currently have insufficient supplies and staff training to respond to an earthquake emergency. Through community meetings, the neighborhood can continue to pool available resources and facilitate individual preparedness. In the Yerba Buena area, the Yerba Buena Consortium has convened a task force on neighborhood preparedness. This group meets regularly and reviews aspects of preparedness including:

D. Residential Building Preparedness
It is of particular importance that the administration of housing projects for elders and disabled persons provide for emergencies by installing emergency power systems, assessing safety and security of mechanical systems, securing valuable materials, addressing hazards in common areas and work areas, eliminating fire hazards, performing a preliminary damage assessment and assessing fire abatement capacity.

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS
If a building was constructed before 1980, it is likely to have significant hazards which need to be addressed. It is advisable that professional survey be performed at each building to evaluate all the critical elements of the mechanical systems. This evaluation would determine if all pipes, pumps, motors and other heavy equipment are properly braced and/or secured.

Staff can evaluate the following areas in order to bring the building to a state of safety and preparedness. This would include:

ELECTRICAL AND EMERGENCY POWER SYSTEMS
Each building should be equipped with an emergency generator more powerful than required by code with the capacity to provide electricity during sustained power outages to operational systems including:

It is advisable to have nearby fuel sources identified which can provide at least 72 hours worth of fuel to augment the code-required four hour fuel supply.

STAFF ASSIGNMENTS
Building staff assignments must be established as part of an emergency building plan . This would include after-hours staff protocols(see appendix, After Hours Reporting), chain of command (see section XI, Emergency Operations Center), and a system to check on every resident and emergency response (see appendix, Residential Building Earthquake Procedures Template and Missing Person Form).

E. Drills
Community drills should be practiced once a year in coordination with neighborhood players and disaster response agencies such as the San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD), the San Francisco Emergency Medical Services (EMS), the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services (OES) and the locally designated First Aid and Mass Care Facilities. The EMS has started to conduct drills in various neighborhoods concentrating on the response capabilities of First Aid Stations, an analysis of stored supplies, emergency staff training, moulage (citizen's acting as casualties for drill purposes) and triage (prioritization of casualties), response time and transport of casualties, coordination between the community and EMS, SFFD disaster response teams, and the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services Emergency Command Center.

Community involvement in these drills is essential. The neighborhood can use the occasion of these disaster response drills to test the community's communication and coordination system. During a drill, the communication system can be activated to transfer information regarding fire, casualties, first aid needs, gas breaks and structural damage to the designated district Fire Headquarters to test both the community's ability to collect information and the SFFD and EMS capacity to transfer this information to the city-wide Emergency Command Center and area hospitals.

Each community facility can also conduct in-house fire/earthquake drills to coincide with the EMS sponsored drill to test fire abatement equipment, evacuation procedures and communication equipment.

An analysis/observation of drills in other parts of the city can point to weak links in each district's disaster response system.



II. COMMUNITY COORDINATION AND RESPONSE

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. The Tenants and Owners Development Corporation (TODCO) (CC1) will serve as the primary communication source between the San Francisco Fire Department's Battalion District #3 via runner, the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services via the Mayor's Emergency Telephone System (METS) or through HAM Radio Operations, the Salvation Army Central Corp (CC2) via walkie-talkie and runner and with connections to the administration at Woolf House, Ceatrice Polite Apartments, Clementina Towers, Mendelsohn House, Alexis Apartments, South of Market Child Care, San Lorenzo Ruiz, St. Francis Place Apartments, Museum Parc Condominiums, KTB Realty Partners, Inc., Center for the Arts and Merrill's Drug.
  2. The Salvation Army Central Corps (CC2) located at 360 Fourth Street will serve as a central communication center and first aid and food distribution facility connecting with the TODCO offices (CC1) located at 230 Fourth Street via walkie-talkie or runner. CC2 will establish contact with the Silvercrest Senior Residence on Shipley Street and the Salvation Army Senior Meals Program Offices on Harrison Street.
  3. After the earthquake, CC1 and CC2 will receive periodic reports from connecting locations about first aid, food and shelter needs. CC1 will keep a log of all communication and report its findings to CC2 for the purpose of coordinating the delivery of services.
  4. Staffing protocols will be established to staff CC1 and CC2 during and after-hours.
  5. Runners from each location will deliver reports to CC1 and CC2 and the San Francisco Fire Department's Battalion District #3 Station, by METS to the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services Neighborhood Coordinator or through HAM Radio through their network when necessary.
  6. Floor Captains in each residence will be trained and equipped to check in on and report on the status of each unit on their floor. The will then report their finding to the site administrator and serve as interpreters throughout the crisis.

The following is a step-by-step community coordination and response plan which will be set into motion as soon as possible after an earthquake strikes. Disaster preparation must be flexible enough to accommodate a variety of contingencies including the magnitude of the earthquake and time of day of the disaster. Each participating agency must develop protocols for staff emergency response assignments for the 66% likelihood that an earthquake will strike after regular working hours.

The Community Coordination and Response Plan is organized into the following aspects:

A. Communication
B. First Aid/Vulnerable Populations
C. Food/Water/Sanitation
D. Shelter
E. Safety and Security

A. Communication Among Providers
(please refer to Communication Flow Chart in appendix)

Two separate communication centers within the Yerba Buena community are designated for the purposes of damage assessment and reporting, first aid coordination, food and water delivery coordination, and communication with disaster response agencies. All information will be relayed to the San Francisco Fire Department's Battalion District #3 at 36 Bluxome Street or to the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services Neighborhood Coordinator at 1003A Turk Street.

COMMUNICATION CENTER 1 (CC1)
The Tenants and Owners Development Corporation (TODCO) (CC1) will serve as the primary communication source between the San Francisco Fire Department's Battalion District #3 via runner, the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services via the Mayor's Emergency Telephone System (METS) or through HAM Radio Operations, the Salvation Army Central Corp (CC2) via walkie-talkie and runner and with connections to the administration at Woolf House, Ceatrice Polite Apartments, Clementina Towers, Mendelsohn House, Alexis Apartments, South of Market Child Care, San Lorenzo Ruiz, St. Francis Place Apartments, Museum Parc Condominiums, KTB Realty Partners, Inc., Center for the Arts and Merrill's Drug.

CC1 will receive periodic reports from connecting locations via walkie-talkie and runner about the following:

A. First aid needs beyond site capability
B. Daily meal count
C. Daily sheltering needs beyond site capability

COMMUNICATION CENTER 2 (CC2)
The Salvation Army Central Corps (CC2) located at 360 Fourth Street will serve as a central communication center and first aid and food distribution facility connecting with the TODCO offices (CC1) located at 230 Fourth Street via walkie-talkie or runner. CC2 will establish contact with the Silvercrest Senior Residence on Shipley Street and the Salvation Army Senior Meals Program Offices on Harrison Street.

CC2 will be equipped with a first aid unit with attending physicians, a canteen capable of producing as many as 5,000 meals every 4 hours, with a capability of storing up to 90,000 meals, a pool of volunteers and a shelter.

Runners between CC1 and CC2 will be designated to serve as communication links and as a back-up to the walkie-talkie system. CC2 is equipped with emergency energy generation. CC2 is equipped with a copying machine which can be used to duplicate flyers for communication with area residents.

RUNNERS
All connecting locations must have runners to back up communication by devices. CC1 will dispatch runners to the San Francisco Fire Department's Battalion District #3 Fire Station on Bluxome Street. The reports as a minimum will include

A. Immediate fire emergency
B. Casualties/medical needs
C. Serious structural damage
D. Search and Rescue

The TODCO van will be available for emergency transport of supplies or casualties and each communication center will store a bicycle for transportation purposes.

B. FLOOR CAPTAINS
In each residence, volunteer Floor Captains will be designated to respond to an earthquake disaster by checking in on every unit on their floor to ascertain the needs of the residents. Floor Captains will then report their findings to the building administrator or responsible staff.

Floor Captains will be chosen for their willingness to volunteer, ability to comprehend their disaster response responsibilities and multi-lingual skills.

Floor Captains will be trained by management in earthquake and fire abatement techniques, and each Floor Captain will be equipped with preparedness supplies such as a first aid kit, flashlight, and resident checklist. Floor Captains will also serve as interpreters throughout the crisis working closely with management.

As a result of volunteering for this responsibility, the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services has provided the opportunity for these volunteers to be covered under the California State Liability Insurance. In order to receive this coverage, volunteers must agree to assist the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services when requested, during a state declared emergency in other areas of the City if they are not needed within the Yerba Buena area. Additionally, each volunteer that receives this coverage must swear an oath to the United States and California Constitutions and sign that oath as provided by the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services.

Note: This insurance is only effective during a state declared emergency.



III. COORDINATION WITH CITY SERVICES

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. Contact will be made with the OES and CC1 with a status report on fire danger, structural damage, casualties and search and rescue needs. The SFFD Battalion District #3 Firehouse will be used when contact cannot be established with the OES through the METS line or HAM Radio Operator. Communication with the Firehouse will be established either by telephone, METS line or runner from CC1.
  2. The Yerba Buena community will continue to work with the OES, EMS and the designated first aid stations to advocate for adequate staff training, first aid supplies, staffing protocols, inter-hospital communication and emergency energy generation.
  3. When contact cannot be made with the OES as described in #1 above, a runner will be dispatched to SFPD and SFFD facilities with a status report on security concerns.
  4. The Yerba Buena community will advocate for multi-lingual capacity of shelters and designated first aid stations.

The San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services and the San Francisco Emergency Medical Services have divided the city into 10 Districts for the purpose of organizing emergency response. This division is along the same lines of the 10 Fire Battalion Districts, each with a fire station as headquarters, and with the designation of a mass care shelter (and alternate location), first aid station (s) and hospitals (not in all districts). The Yerba Buena area is located in Battalion District #3 which is border by the eastern waterfront, Market Street, area north and south of Market, parts of the Mission and part of the Potrero Hill area. The population is estimated at approximately 23,000 people who speak a variety of languages including English, Cantonese, Mandarin, Spanish, Russian and Filipino languages.

Battalion District #3 AREA
South of Market, SouthernWaterfront
HEADQUARTERS Firehouse, 36 Bluxome Street

MASS CARE Moscone Convention Center
Fourth and Howard Streets

Potrero Hill Middle School
655 De Haro at 18th Street
Hospitals None

First Aid South of Market Health Center
551 Minna Street

San Francisco City Clinic
356 7th Street

A. San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services

1003A Turk Street, between Gough and Laguna Streets
Contact: Frank Shober
Telephone: (415) 558-2703

  1. The San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services will provide a direct link between TODCO and their neighborhood coordinator. This link will be established either through the METS line or through HAM Radio operators. At the time of an earthquake, contact between CC1 and the OES will be made either by METS line or HAM Radio operations and a report of casualties and medical needs, fire abatement status, structural integrity of area buildings, and search and rescue needs of the residents of the Yerba Buena area.

B. San Francisco Fire Department Battalion District #3

Firehouse 36 Bluxome Street between 4th and 5th Streets
and Townsend and Brannan Streets
Contact: Battalion Chiefs Telephone: (415) 558-3208
METS line: 2208

(A Watch) Chief Smith
(B Watch) Chief Tabacco
(C Watch) Chief Frisella

When the San Francisco mayor's Office of Emergency Services is unable to function (either due to severe damage or other causes), the Battalion District #3 Firehouse will be the designated headquarters for disaster response for the Yerba Buena area. In this event, when an earthquake strikes, contact between CC1 and the SFFD Battalion District #3 Firehouse will be made either by telephone, METS line or runner with a report of casualties and medical needs, fire abatement status, structural integrity of area buildings, and search and rescue needs of the residents of the Yerba Buena area.

C. South of Market Health Center

551 Minna Street, between 6th and 7th Streets
Contact: Joanne Miller, Clinic Manager
Cristina Sprague, Head Nurse
Telephone: (415) 626-2951

After research into the state of preparedness of the South of Market Health Center, it has been determined that the facility is seriously lacking in both supplies and disaster medical training. Currently, staff has reported they can perform triage and first aid for approximately 100 persons per day for 3 days. Staff consists of Medical Director at 50% time, 2 MDs at 100% time, 1 mid-level Physician's Assistant at 100% time, 1 RN at 100% time and 3 LVNs at 100% time. Staff does not have adequate emergency medical response training. The Health Center does not have an adequate count of first aid supplies or criteria for quantity and type to store and the Center does to have after-hours staffing protocols. The Center does not currently have emergency energy generation. There is o communication system with the nearest hospital (San Francisco General) except the telephone.

D. San Francisco City Clinic (STD Clinic)

356 7th Street, between Folsom and Harrison Streets
Contact: Walta de Lemos Brown, Administrator
Paul Hayes, Staff
Telephone: (415) 487-5500

After research into the state of preparedness of the South of Market Health Center, it has been determined that the facility is seriously lacking in both supplies and disaster medical training. Currently, staff has reported they can perform triage and first aid for approximately 75 persons per day for 3 days. The staff consists of 6 to 12 medical staff who currently perform procedures for a clientele suffering from sexually transmitted diseases, and this includes testing, diagnosis, treatment and counseling.

Staff does not have adequate emergency medical response training and does not have adequate count of supplies on hand or criteria for quantity and variety of material to store. The Clinic does not have after-hours staffing protocols. The Clinic does not currently have emergency energy generation. There is no communication system with the nearest hospital (San Francisco General) except the telephone.

E. Moscone Convention Center

Howard Street, between 3rd and 4th Streets
Contact: Chris Crowley, Event Manager
Telephone: (415) 974-4013

In the case of a damaging earthquake the Moscone Center will most likely be the primary shelter in the Yerba Buena area for as many as 22,000 persons and will be supplied with cots, blankets and food by the American Red Cross. Red Cross nurses will provide first aid and triage. Security will be provided in part by KTB Realty Partners, Inc. along with Red Cross volunteers. The shelter also has cooking facilities with emergency energy generation. There are no supplies on site with the exception of limited medical supplies.

F. Potrero Hill Middle School

(Alternate mass care shelter site)
655 De Haro at 18th Street

In the case of a damaging earthquake, the Potrero Hill Middle School can serve as a shelter for as many as 3,000 persons and will be supplied with cots, blankets and food by the American Red Cross. Red Cross nurses will provide first aid and triage. Security will be provided by Red Cross volunteers. The shelter also has cooking facilities with no emergency energy generation. There are no supplies on the site.



IV. OUTREACH AND TRAINING

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. The Yerba Buena Consortium will convene periodic meetings with area service providers to continue to develop and update the Neighborhood Earthquake Preparedness Plan.
  2. Periodic meetings will be held to reinforce neighborhood plan procedures and to facilitate preparedness among residents.
  3. Service providers and residents will receive trainings in CPR, first aid and other disaster related procedures.
  4. Residents will be given multi-lingual door hangers to be used to summon help and report on status.

A. Outreach to Service Providers
After periodic community meetings convened by the Yerba Buena Consortium, service providers in the Yerba Buena area will continue to develop, update and reinforce preparedness and response plans. These meetings will occur twice yearly and be augmented with EMS coordinated drills when possible.

B. Training for Service Providers
Service providers can train their own staff on the process and protocols outlined in the neighborhood plan. Other training for all staff should include Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid with recertification as required by the American Red Cross or certifying agency. For residential building managers, there is a Fire Safety Director class offered by the San Francisco Community College District. This class covers fire and earthquake emergencies and fire prevention.

C. Outreach to Residents
Earthquake preparedness and response trainings with residents should occur at least twice yearly and should be presented with multi-lingual materials as necessary. These presentations can include the following materials:

  1. Multi-lingual presentation of "Make Yourself A Promise: Earthquake Preparedness for Yourself and Your Community." The video tape is accompanied by a Program Guide for public presentation.
  2. Earthquake preparedness checklists.
  3. Additional materials provided by the American Red Cross, and California Office Of Emergency Services Coastal Region. Presentations should be located at the site, residence, workplace, school or community center.

D. Training for Residents
Residents should be encouraged to take part in CPR and first aid training provided by the American Red Cross. In addition, the San Francisco Fire Department offers a training course entitled Neighborhood Emergency Response Teams (NERT) covering all aspects of neighborhood preparedness and response.

E. Training for TODCO and Salvation Army Central Corps Staff
(see Appendix for flow chart)
TODCO and Salvation Army Central Corps Staff should be trained in the Incident Command System established by the National Fire Protection Association. This training will help ensure that an organized structure exists and is functional following a damaging earthquake.

F. Door Signs
As part of a preparedness program, each resident will be given a door sign to be used after the disaster to indicate if immediate help is needed (please see appendix).


V. FOOD AND WATER

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. Providers will encourage individual storage of non-perishable water and foodstuffs for a period of at least 72 hours through a series of public presentations.
  2. The Salvation Army will coordinate with CC1 and CC2 the delivery of 30,000 meals daily for a period of three days to residential buildings. Each residence will furnish volunteers or staff to deliver the meals to individual units.
  3. Following a major earthquake, the South of Market Grocery and the proposed market on Fourth and Harrison Streets will close their doors to the general public and serve as a repository of emergency supplies for neighborhood residents.
  4. An effort must be made to obtain a forklift that can be used for delivery of food and water pallets as well as removal of heavy debris.
  5. A 72 hour supply of drinking water and regular rotation of the supply needs to be established in the area. This plan should also include a supply and rotation program for the Moscone Mass Care Center.

A. Food and Storage
Individual food storage is the most effective way to address the scarcity of food during an earthquake disaster. Through a series of public presentations, agencies, providers and residents are encouraged to store at least a 72 hour supply of non-perishable food items. At the time of a damaging earthquake, service providers will issue flyers encouraging resident to take precautions to insure the safety of consumables.

The Salvation Army Central Corps will store an emergency food supply that is capable of feeding 10,000 persons for a period of 72 hours. With the assistance of the American Red Cross, In-kind donations from various sources have contributed to this one-time food supply donation. The Salvation Army Kitchen has sufficient storage for these supplies and will rotate these supplies with their regular meal service to assure that the food source stays within its expiration dates.

B. Emergency Food Delivery
The Salvation Army Central Corps will be able to respond with approximately 30,000 meals daily for three days after the earthquake targeted for the Yerba Buena area residents. The Salvation Army will also provide approximately 30 to 100 volunteers per day for three days for delivery of the food. In addition, the Salvation Army will set up two emergency canteens at 360 Fourth Street with the capacity to produce approximately 1,000 meals daily for three days.

The process by which food will be distributed is tied directly to communication through the two Communication Centers. TODCO (CC1) and the Salvation Army Central Corps (CC2) will receive daily morning requests for meals from their connecting locations. The two Centers will relay information about each site and their needs and the Salvation Army will coordinate volunteer delivery to the sites which will offer staff and volunteer assistance in the delivery of the meals to residents.

A contingency plan would instruct all sites to communicate directly with the Salvation Army Central Corps.

The American Red Cross will additionally be able to supply some feeding at the Moscone Convention Center if an when it is opened as a Red Cross Shelter. Moscone Center has cooking facilities and refrigeration equipment with emergency energy generation. This capability is contingent upon food delivery to the Moscone Convention Center which may not occur until after the first 72 hours.

A forklift should be acquired to assist in the delivery of both food and water as well as it may prove to be useful in the removal of heavy debris blocking accessibility.

C. Water Supply
It is essential that individuals and staff of the Yerba Buena area have an adequate supply of water (one gallon per person per day for a period of 72 hours) stored in a safe area in their homes and/or offices. If the water supply is contaminated or disrupted by the earthquake, it will take up to 72 hours for an outside source to reach the City according to the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services and the American Red Cross.

An emergency supply of up to 40,000 gallons of non-potable water may exist in the Yerba Buena Gardens accessed through a well located on Howard Street between Third and Fourth Streets in the Security Access Hall between the Marriott and Moscone North Convention Facilities. This source of water contains heavy metals that may be filtered and can then be used for purposes of sterilization and sanitation but, not for drinking water. The source hold up to 40,000 gallons and depending on the time of the day may be empty. Since the storage tank varies from 12:00 am (40,000 gallons) to 6:00 am (empty). The storage tank is replenished between 6:00 am to 12:00 am. Because of the variables of supply and recent unreliability of the pump it would be unwise, at this time, to rely on this well as a source of water, potable or non-potable.

D. The South of Market Grocery
At the time of an earthquake the South of Market Grocery located at the corner of Fourth and Howard Streets will close its doors to the general public and serve as a repository of consumer goods for the Yerba Buena neighborhood residents. After an initial assessment of the needs of the neighborhood's most vulnerable (elderly, frail, disabled) residents by resident managers communicating through CC1 and CC2, TODCO will determine the distribution of foodstuffs remaining within the Grocery.

This agreement will also exist with the proposed Market (CALA/BELL) on the corner of Fourth and Harrison Streets. This market is not scheduled for opening until 1996 or later.


VI. SHELTER

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. Each residence will serve as a ground floor shelter for 25% of their resident population and will provide cots and blankets.
  2. The Salvation Army Central Corps will serve as a shelter for 240 area elders and disabled persons and will provide cots, blankets, food, first aid and counseling.
  3. Additioal diesel fuel storage needs to be established for emergency energy generation. Currently TODCO has a cummulative capacity of a 24 hour supply. TODCO must find a location for addtional storage capacity to increase its capacity to a 72 hour supply for all of its properties.

At the time of an earthquake, shelter will be provided by a number of facilities each with a different capacity. Residents may choose shelter depending on the status of the safety of their living space.

Each residential building may at their discretion be prepared to shelter up to 25% of their population on the ground floor. An adequate number of cots and blankets would need to be stored to accommodate residents. Other shelter in the area includes:

A. Moscone Convention Center

747 Howard Street, between Third and Fourth Streets
Capacity: 22,000 persons
Services provided:
cots, blankets, food, water, first aid andcounseling services
Supplies stored on site: none

Note: a Red Cross trailer with cots, blankets and first aid supplies isdesignated for this location (capacity 500 persons)

This shelter will be open to the general public and will be administered by the American Red Cross. The Moscone Convention Center will additionally be the alternate site for the Mayor's office as well as the alternate site for the Red Cross Emergency Operations Center. As a result this shelter will be inspected by the Department of Public Works on its first tier inspection where all other shelters fall into tier two inspection. This means Moscone Convention Center will be inspected (required by the American Red Cross prior to opening a shelter) in the first one to four hours. All other shelter sites will be inspected within five to forty-eight hours.

B. Potrero Hill Middle School (alternate site)

655 De Haro at 18th Street
Capacity: 3,000 persons
Services provided: cots, blankets food, water, first aid andcounseling services
Supplies stored on site: None
This shelter is open to the general public and will be administered by the American Red Cross.

C. The Salvation Army Central Corps

360 Fourth Street between Folsom and Harrison Streets
Capacity: 240 elders and disabled people only
Services provided: cots, blankets, food, water first aid andcounseling services
Supplies stored on site: None
This shelter is open to area elders and disabled persons and will be administered by the Salvation Army.


VII. FIRST AID

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. Encourage individual residents in the Yerba Buena Neighborhood to take CPR and first aid certification courses and store adequate first aid supplies through community lectures and TODCO earthquake preparedness videotape.
  2. Encourage agencies and residential complexes to keep on-site first aid supplies to treat a capacity of 25% of that agencies population.
  3. Provide and/or encourage agencies and residential complex staff to take first aid and CPR training.

San Francisco has no hospital or future plans for one in the vicinity of the Yerba Buena area. Even if San Francisco's Department of Public Health determines the Yerba Buena Gardens Esplanade to be a casualty collection point their services will be limited and perhaps delayed in its initial set-up. The City's 911 Emergency Service will be overloaded and no ambulance service will exist following a damaging earthquake. It is for this reason that the Yerba Buena area must be prepared to deal with as many injured following a major earthquake as possible for the initial 72 hours following.

Experience with the Loma Prieta and the Northridge Earthquakes have demonstrated how overwhelmed the 911 Emergency System will be as well as hospitals operating beyond their capacity. Minor injuries treated immediately will prevent these injuries from becoming major or life threatening and reduce the demand for emergency and hospital care.

The three basic components of first aid preparedness and response are the following:

A. Individual Supplies and Training
B. Agency Supplies and Training
C. Area First Aid Stations

A. Individual Supplies and Training
Through the use of the TODCO earthquake preparedness videotape and community lectures, individuals can be encouraged to store adequate first aid supplies and to obtain first aid training through the American Red Cross, American Heart Association and other groups such as the San Francisco Paramedics Association. It is critical that individuals become trained and prepared, so they can not only take care of their own minor injuries, but those around them with minor injuries.

B. Agency Supplies and Training
Each agency , residential complex, workplace and community center should have a first aid kit on-site with the capacity to treat 25% of the agency population. First aid kits can be purchased through a number of outlets including the San Francisco Paramedics Association. Each agency should require staff to obtain yearly training and recertification for first aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and agency administration should facilitate and provide for these trainings.

C. Area First Aid Stations
The following is a list of area First Aid Stations:

  1. The Salvation Army Central Corps
    360 Fourth Street, between Folsom and Harrison Streets
    Capacity: e counselors with the potential of 4 more, including 2 bi- lingual Chinese/English, Medical supplies for approximately500 for 3 days with a warehouse of medical and othersupplies located nearby on Shipley Street.
    Emergency energy generation: No
    Transportation: 3 vans, 1 wheelchair lift equipped bus

    The Salvation Army Central Corps is in the process of identifying volunteers that are licensed and have medical experience to add to their list of resources. They are additionally looking at the South of Market Health Services moving into their facility which will add 1 doctor and 2 nurses to their on call daytime staffing.

  2. The South of Market Health Center
    551 Minna Street, between 6th and 7th Streets
    Capacity: 2.5 doctors
    5 nurses
    Medical supplies for approximately 100 for 3 days
    Emergency energy generation: None
    Transportation: None

  3. San Francisco City Clinic
    356 7th Street, between Folsom and Harrison Streets
    Capacity: 4 doctors
    6-12 assistants
    Medical supplies for approximately 75 for 3 days
    Emergency energy generation: None
    Transportation: None

  4. Limited first aid supplies are located at area shelters with Red Cross provided nursing.

    Moscone Convention Center

    747 Howard Street, between Third and Fourth Streets
    Capacity: Depends on accessibility for Red Cross volunteers, 1-3 nurses on staff
    Medical supplies for approximately 50 persons total
    Emergency energy generation: Yes
    Transportation: None

    Potrero Hill Middle School

    655 De Haro at 18th Street
    Capacity: Depends on accessibility of Red Cross volunteers
    Medical supplies: None
    Emergency energy generation: None
    Transportation: None

  5. The North and South of Market Adult Day Health Center (ADH) located at 55 Mabini will serve as an alternate First Aid Center with limited supplies and personnel. The center will be opened by Mendelsohn House staff after normal working hours and will be staffed by volunteers and ADH staff when possible after the needs of ADH clients are addressed and San Francisco doesn't require their staff to report to other areas of the CIty.

As indicated in the introduction of this plan, the need for first aid will vary based upon the magnitude and the time of day the earthquake occurs. In a situation such as the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, there will be little need for first aid and emergency services should be available in a relatively short period of time.

In the event of a more serious earthquake somewhere between the Loma Prieta and the 1906 Earthquakes we should anticipate greater difficulty with receiving emergency medical services and will require a greater need for individuals to be trained in first aid.

In the event of a magnitude earthquake that is equal to or greater than the one in 1906, the community will have the need to have even greater numbers of first aid personnel. Under this scenario, a triage system will need to be put in place to deal with the large quantity of casualties our community will experience.

In order to provide the level of first aid trained individuals we will need, the residential buildings will need to survey their residents and provide a list to TODCO. This will allow TODCO to call upon these trained volunteers as well as certified nurses and doctors that may reside in these buildings. Additionally first aid training will be made available on a regular basis to increase the number of individuals that respond.

Depending on the number of trained individuals available, there are two ways to respond to the need. If we have sufficient number of trained persons, those that are trained can take the lead in instructing others on how to assist.

At any time during the first aid care we will do no more than first aid treatment in addition to stabilizing those in need until help arrives. The triage system is broken into three separate categories and will be in effect when the numbers of injured are greater than the capabilities of volunteers available or until outside help arrives.

  1. Immediate: Those that need immediate assistance to prevent them from becoming critical or beyond the level of initial first aid.
  2. Delayed: Those that have very minor injuries and do not have immediate need for care.
  3. Dead: Those that are so critical that they will not be able to be sustained for a long period of time.


VIII. VULNERABLE POPULATIONS AND AGENCY PROTOCOLS

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. Individuals with special needs should develop special preparedness plans to secure their physical environment and obtain needed emergency support.
  2. Agency staff can facilitate the development of preparedness plans for persons with special needs and presentations and individual reviews.
  3. Each residential facility should have a roster of residents centrally located and accessible to administration and emergency services personnel.
  4. Each agency should prepare EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY PROCEDURES and add their specific plan to the Yerba Buena Earthquake Preparedness Plan.
  5. All outreach, response and preparedness information must be multi-lingual and provide for language needs of the population.

    The population in the Yerba Buena area including a large number of elderly, disabled, frail and non-English speaking persons who have special needs and who present a particular challenge in terms of disaster preparedness and response. Three aspects of preparedness for vulnerable populations include:

    1. Individual Preparedness
    2. Agency Support and Coordination
    3. Multi-lingual Considerations

A. INDIVIDUAL PREPAREDNESS
Each individual with special needs must make specific plans to secure their physical living environment and plan for support at the time of a disaster. This plan would include assistance from neighbors, family, friends and agency support staff. Individuals on life support systems should find access to emergency energy generation and those who cannot easily ambulate should provide for extended time periods without outside help. Non-English speaking persons must find bi-lingual support for access to information and emergency instructions.

Each individual must prepare a personally customized Preparedness Plan (please see appendix #10) in order to anticipate a wide range of contingencies at the time of a disaster.

B. AGENCY SUPPORT AND COORDINATION
Administrators, employers and social service providers can facilitate individual preparedness through a series of employee meetings and public meetings. Annual resident reviews could include individual disaster preparedness planning.

Each facility should have a roster of residents and employees at a place centrally located with a special designation for vulnerable individuals for administrative and SFFD Search and Rescue purposes.

An important addendum to this plan is an Earthquake Emergency Procedure for each facility (please see appendix: EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY PROCEDURES).

Emergency Procedures should include as a minimum the following:

  1. Staff assignments
  2. Damage assessment (see appendix #15, damage assessment report)
  3. Immediately check on all residents (see appendix #16, missing persons report)
  4. Staff after-hours protocols (see appendix #13, after-hours reporting template)
  5. Contacting emergencies services: Fire, Police, Ambulance (see appendix #5, YBC Communications Flow Chart)
  6. Procedures for caring for the disabled
  7. Multi-lingual communication
  8. Physical plant considerations
  9. Back-up systems
  10. Fuel and emergency equipment
  11. Emergency energy generation
  12. Food, water, other supplies
  13. First aid, CPR training and supplies
  14. Coordination with community (see appendix #5, YBC Communication Flow Chart)

C. MULTI-LINGUAL CONSIDERATIONS
The population of the Yerba Buena area has a significant number (over 50%) of non-English speaking persons. During the Loma Prieta earthquake there was no public information available in languages other than English. Even though the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services is developing a program that will address this need, Multi-lingual preparedness information is an important way to address the needs of non-English speaking persons. Agencies should identify staff and volunteers who will serve as interpreters and translators to communicate with residents at any point in the crisis.



IX. SECURITY AND SANITATION

SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN

  1. Staffing protocols should be established to provide security at residential facilities.

  2. Floor monitors and volunteers can assist staff with security.
  3. TODCO will attempt to establish protocols with contract security services to provide 24 hour coverage after the earthquake.
  4. Residents will be encouraged to store heavy duty plastic bags and will be instructed in how to use them for the purpose of safely storing human waste.
  5. Residents should be encouraged to use empty water containers for storage of urine.

A. Security
Since the San Francisco Police Department's first priority will be to protect San Francisco's essential services and other security concerns (a police presence may be established around the Moscone Convention Center since the Mayor's Office will most likely relocate there), every facility should plan to provide its own security without place untrained persons in dangerous situations. The police are the only contact for serious security problems. Each residence should station available staff at the front entrance to control exit and egress. Residents must be able to identify friends and family members who have come to assist them. Floor monitors and volunteers can be stationed in the lobbies to assist staff and administrators.

KTB Realty Partners, Inc. will provide perimeter security around the Yerba Buena Gardens and Moscone Convention Center. KTB Realty Partners has negotiated a memorandum of understanding with American Protective Services, Inc. (APS) to provide additional security to the area following an earthquake. Although KTB Realty Partners, Inc. is on a priority list with APS, they are not on their priority 1 list. First priorities are known medical, communication and transportation facilities. This means that the level of security provided by KTB Realty Partners will depend on the number of guards and staff available and only after the Yerba Buena Gardens themselves are secure.

TODCO will attempt to establish protocols with other contract security services to provide 24 hour security for the Yerba Buena area after the earthquake strikes.

The South of Market Grocery will provide its own private security guard to prevent looting.

B. Sanitation
Individuals should be prepared for safe and hygienic waste storage for as long as a week. Human waste disposal will become an important health consideration if water mains should break. Residents should be encouraged to store heavy duty plastic bags for waste storage with instructions to place the plastic bags in the toilet to catch the waste, and to tie the bags securely and store them in the bath tub until the waste can be disposed of properly. Administrators will store heavy duty plastic bags to supply to residents if necessary. Empty water containers should be used by residents for storage or urine. And residential staff should make arrangements for pick-up of plastic bags and containers with human waste. The use of a container on wheels is recommended to avoid spillage during transport.

In the case of a major disaster, the National Guard will transport latrines to the afflicted area as soon as possible. Delivery of latrines should include those that are disabled accessible.

The storage of lime or other disinfectant materials should not be done by residential facilities, it is both dangerous and impractical.

Household garbage should be placed in heavy duty plastic bags and stored inside each unit separate from human waste. Garbage of any kind should not be stored in common areas until some form of disposal has been established.



X. ADVOCACY

Aside from the extensive task of encouraging individual preparedness, agency preparedness and community coordination of services, the community needs to address the state of preparedness of government disaster response agencies. At some time in the response to an earthquake, the neighborhood will become independent upon police, fire, shelter and first aid facilities. If these services are inadequate, the neighborhood will find itself at a significant disadvantage.

The neighborhood can begin to correct oversight in government planning by utilizing community resources to inform and advise.

The following are advocacy issues that directly affect the Yerba Buena neighborhood:

  1. Designated District #3 First Aid Stations currently do not have adequate stored first aid supplies.
  2. Staff at designated District #3 First Aid Stations currently do not have adequate staff training for emergency disaster response.
  3. There is currently no after-hours staffing protocols at the designated District #3 First Aid Stations.
  4. District #3 does not have a designated hospital for the district.
  5. There is currently no communication system, beside the telephone, between the first aid stations and a designated hospital.
  6. District #3 First Aid Stations do not currently have emergency energy generation.
  7. There is a need for periodic coordination meetings to address earthquake preparedness and response with the District #3 San Francisco Fire Department's Firehouse, designated First Aid Stations, hospital, mass care facilities, the American Red Cross, community representatives, San Francisco's Emergency Medical Services and the Mayor's Office of Emergency Services.



XI. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER

The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) for the Yerba Buena area will be located at the TODCO offices located at 230 Fourth Street. This EOC will function as the primary communication and command center for the Yerba Buena area. The communication between the area resources, San Francisco Fire Department's District #3 Headquarters and/or the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services.

The Emergency Operations Center will be staffed by TODCO employees and operate under the Incident Command System (ICS).

Note: The Emergency Operations Center needs to be added to the Woolf House emergency generator.

THE INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM (ICS)
The Incident Command System is a method for managing emergencies which is widely used by emergency responders throughout the State of California. The system provides for an organized response to meet the demands of emergency incidents and larger disasters in a rapid and efficient manner. ICS is a practical method for dividing labor and responsibilities when responding to these events.

The ICS is flexible and allows for the use of people present at the time of an incident. For planning and training purposes, it is preferable to assign people to perform each function so that they develop an understanding of what will be required in responding to an emergency.

The ICS provides a process for managing the response and recovery efforts following a disaster. It consists of a chain of command which incorporates four sections--Plans, Operations, Logistics, and Finance--under the overall leadership of an Incident Commander. Each of the four sections operates under its own Section Chief and has its own tasks or job descriptions. The tasks identify priorities that arise during a disaster event and provide for a uniformly structured response and recovery effort.


INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Emergency Operations Center Job Descriptions


INCIDENT COMMANDER
One person manages the overall response effort: the Incident Commander. The person assigned to this job is the plan administrator. In the absence of the plan administrator, another staff member may be designated to act in that role until the administrator is able to assume the position. Specific responsibilities are the systematically divided among other capable and competent people. Each ICS team leader is referred to as a Section Chief. The Incident Commander oversees the Section Chiefs and coordinates the response activities as follows:

PLANS CHIEF
The Plans Chief provides current information on the facility situation and projects short and longer term needs for recovery and return to normal operation. He/she is responsible for the following:

OPERATIONS CHIEF
The Operations Chief directs the carrying out of initial response functions, reporting results and situation status to the Incident Commander and other Section Chiefs, as follows:

LOGISTICS CHIEF
The Logistics Chief coordinates the use of existing and the procurement of needed resources to ensure the health and safety of residents, staff and volunteers. Responsibilities include the following:

FINANCE CHIEF
The Finance Chief is responsible for overseeing, processing and documenting all cost associated with the disaster:

TODCO COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE
The TODCO Company Representative is responsible for overseeing all TODCO properties and making decisions regarding the building safety and security.

Report to the incident command center as soon as possible
Review overall situation with Incident Commander
Go to and inspect each property to personally confirm (sequence: Woolf House and Grocery Store, Ceatrice Polite Apartments, Mendelsohn House, Adult Day Health Care and Knox SRO)
Grave building hazards: fire, gas leaks, major damage
Grave medical emergencies
Confirm best possible immediate response to grave conditions with staff at each site
Go to South of Market Adult Day Health Care and confirm availability as first aid center; advise about location of grave medical emergencies
Go to South of Market Grocery and exercise right to purchase entire inventory; confirm store is secure
Confirm secure status of company storefronts, building entrances, and parking lots
Observe general conditions in surrounding areas
Report back to Command Center after each property's inspection
Monitor continuing grave conditions with additional inspections, etc.
Assess status/availability of Moscone Mass Care Facility and First Aid Station
Confirm staffing rotation plan
Go to Salvation Army Senior Activity Center to confirm Salvation Army response activity
Authorize emergency contracting as needed

OTHER FUNCTIONS
There are a number of other functions which the Incident Commander should address in planning stages:

APPENDICES

  1. Map of Area/Disaster Relief Facilities
  2. List of Yerba Buena Plan Members
  3. Yerba Buena Neighborhood Housing
  4. San Francisco Mass Care and Casualty Care Facilities
  5. Yerba Buena Neighborhood Communication Flow Chart
  6. Yerba Buena Neighborhood Emergency Summary Report
  7. #1 Site Emergency Report
  8. #2 Site Emergency Supply Report
  9. Residential Buildings Emergency Plan Template
  10. Individual Earthquake Preparedness Plan
  11. Earthquake Preparedness Checklist
  12. Earthquake Preparedness for People with Disabilities
  13. After Hours Reporting Template
  14. Incident Command System Organizational Chart
  15. Damage Assessment Report
  16. Missing Persons Report
  17. Message Form
  18. Door Hanger Sample

This plan addresses each of the above aspects of disaster preparedness and response. There is a SUMMARY AND ACTION PLAN at the beginning of each section containing recommendations on how to achieve preparedness goals.

YERBA BUENA AREA DISASTER RELIEF FACILITIES MAP

American Red Cross
1550 Sutter Street
San Francisco, CA 94109
202-0600

Jim Aldrich, Lisa Ferro, Greg O'Ryan
Alexis Apartments
390 Clementina Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
495-3690

Brenda Thomas
Ceatrice Polite Apartments
321 Clementina Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

Albert Lee
Center for the Arts
701 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
978-2700

Dave Dial
Central City Seniors' Unit
1155 Market Street, Suite 104
San Francisco, CA 94103
554-3277

Linda LiBrize
Clementina Towers
320 Clementina Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
392-4340

William Chung
Commission on Aging
25 Van Ness Avenue, 6th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94102
626-1033

David Ishida, Executive Director
The John Stewart Company
2310 Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94133
391-4321

Ned York, Loren Sanborne, Priscilla Ross
KTB Realty Partners, Inc.
750 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
247-6500

Mary McKue
Mendelsohn House
737 Folsom Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
243-8140

Willie Abasta
Merrill's Drug
805 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
781-1669

Dave Reese
Moscone Convention Center
747 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103-3181
974-4013

Chris Crowley
Museum Parc Condominiums
300 Third Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
495-8547

Karen Carr
North and South of Market Adult Day Health Care
55 Mabini Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
882-7301

Elizabeth Boardman
North of Market Senior Services
333 Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
885-2274

Vera Haile
Planning for Elders in the Central City
1370 Mission Street, 3rd Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
703-0188

Marie Jobling
Salvation Army Central Corps and Senior Activity Center
360 Fourth Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
777-2677

Lt. Eng
Salvation Army Nutrition Program
850 Harrison Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
777-5350

Evie Dexter
Salvation Army PREP Program
850 Harrison Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
777-5350

Bob Moorehead
Saint Francis Place Apartments
One Saint Francis Place
San Francisco, CA 94107
777-1512

Pat Soma
San Francisco City Clinic
356 7th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
864-8100

Debra Williams-Taki
San Francisco Fire Department Battalion District #3
36 Bluxome Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
558-3208

Chief Friscella or Tabacco
San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services
1003A Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
558-2703

Carl Hedelston, Adm. John Bitoff
San Francisco Police Department, Southern Station
850 Bryant Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
553-1373

Captain Michael Yalon
San Francisco Redevelopment Agency
770 Golden Gate Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94102
749-2400

Michael Kaplan, Helen Sause, Cathy Pickering
San Lorenzo Ruiz Center
50 Rizal Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
495-5007

John Garcia
Senior Power
805 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
541-9629

Shirley Bierly
Silvercrest Residence
133 Shipley Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
543-5381

Ken Iremonger
South of Market Child Care Center
366 Clementina Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
391-0388

Judith Baker
South of Market Health Center
551 Minna Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
626-2951

Joanne Miller
Woolf House
801 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
981-2165

Jill Davis
Yerba Buena Marketing Alliance
760 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
541-0312

Anita Hill
Red Cross Shelter Locations and Information
Moscone Convention Center
Howard Street, between 3rd and 4th Streets
Contact: Chris Crowley, Event Manager
Telephone: (415) 974-4013

In the case of a damaging earthquake the Moscone Center will most likely be the primary shelter in the Yerba Buena area for as many as 22,000 persons and will be supplied with cots, blankets and food by the American Red Cross. Red Cross nurses will provide first aid and triage. Security will be provided in part by KTB Realty Partners, Inc. along with Red Cross volunteers. The shelter also has cooking facilities with emergency energy generation. There are no supplies on site with the exception of limited medical supplies.

Potrero Hill Middle School
(Alternate mass care shelter site)
655 De Haro at 18th Street
Contact: None
In the case of a damaging earthquake, the Potrero Hill Middle School can serve as a shelter for as many as 3,000 persons and will be supplied with cots, blankets and food by the American Red Cross. Red Cross nurses will provide first aid and triage. Security will be provided by Red Cross volunteers. The shelter also has cooking facilities with no emergency energy generation. There are no supplies on the site.

Yerba Buena Area First Aid Centers
South of Market Health Center
551 Minna Street, between 6th and 7th Streets
Contact: Joanne Miller, Clinic Manager
Cristina Spraque, Head Nurse
Telephone: (415) 626-2951
After research into the state of preparedness of the South of Market Health Center, it has been determined that the facility is seriously lacking in both supplies and disaster medical training. Currently, staff has reported they can perform triage and first aid for approximately 100 persons per day for 3 days. Staff consists of Medical Director at 50% time, 2 MDs at 100% time, 1 mid-level Physician's Assistant at 100% time, 1 RN at 100% time and 3 LVNs at 100% time. Staff does not have adequate emergency medical response training. The Health Center does not have an adequate count of first aid supplies or criteria for quantity and type to store and the Center does ot have afterhours staffing protocols. The Center does not currently have emergency energy generation. There is o communication system with the nearest hospital (San Francisco General) except the telephone.

San Francisco City Clinic (STD Clinic)
356 7th Street, between Folsom and Harrison Streets
Contact: Walta de Lemos Brown, Administrator
Paul Hayes, Staff
Telephone: (415) 487-5500
After research into the state of preparedness of the South of Market Health Center, it has been determined that the facility is seriously lacking in both supplies and disaster medical training. Currently, staff has reported they can perform triage and first aid for approximately 75 persons per day for 3 days. The staff consists of 6 to 12 medical staff who currently perform procedures for a clientele suffering from sexually transmitted diseases, and this includes testing, diagnosis, treatment and counseling. Staff does not have adequate emergency medical response training and does not have adequate count of supplies on hand or criteria for quantity and variety of material to store. The Clinic does not have afterhours staffing protocols. The Clinic does not currently have emergency energy generation. There is no communication system with the nearest hospital (San Francisco General) except the telephone.

YERBA BUENA NEIGHBORHOOD EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM COMMUNICATION SYSTEM

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YERBA BUENA NEIGHBORHOOD EMERGENCY SUMMARY REPORT

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EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY PROCEDURES TEMPLATE FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

BUILDING STAFF (available to respond)
Manager/Administrator (qty)
Security (qty)
Maintenance (qty)
Desk Clerk (qty)
Others (qty)

In the event of an earthquake, leadership is of utmost importance. A key staff person must assume the responsibility of carrying out policy and procedure. In most cases the Manager/Administrator is the person responsible for the proper implementation of this plan. In the event of his/her absence, the Lead Maintenance person assumes the leadership role.

In any event, all staff must be made aware of their responsibility to assure the safety of themselves, the residents and the building security. If the normal leadership is not available, they must understand their role in implementing the emergency plan and ensure strong leadership throughout the emergency period until the normal leadership arrives and takes over.

I. When an earthquake occurs, the responsible person must assess the immediate needs of the residents and building hazards and call Emergency Services (911 Ambulance/Fire) if necessary.

A. The Administrator or designee should assign the following duties immediately:

  1. Assign one person to stay at or near the front office (preferred staff - desk clerk, bookkeeper, assistant administrator) and ground floor lobby area to promote security, answer telephones, calm residents and to provide access for emergency respondents.

  2. Assign Lead Maintenance to inspect all emergency back-up systems including but not limited to: fire life safety system, emergency generator(s), sprinkler systems, elevator back- up system, and telephones. The inspection should include brief notes describing the condition of these systems.

  3. Assessing second Maintenance or Janitorial person to inspect main gas and water lines, boilers, laundry room(s) and ground floor area.

    Inspections at this time should be brief and occur immediately following the earthquake. The inspection is to note damage that has caused malfunctioning and/or breakage of vital components of the physical plant.

    Systems showing obvious damage should be shut down. Gas lines should be carefully inspected prior to shut-off. Because PG & E is incredibly busy during earthquake emergencies, lines operating satisfactorily that are shut down may not be returned to operation by PG & E for several days.

    If gas leaks are suspect, or electrical fires have occurred, circuit breakers should be cut-off immediately. Gas meters should also be shut-off if an actual leak is identified. Know your systems, keep your Emergency Shut Off Valve Chart posted in several locations, and maintain an updated Emergency Contact List.

  4. While brief inspections are being made the Administrator should immediately inspect units and assist residents that are disabled, and/or frail. These persons should be listed on your Disabled/Frail Emergency List and should be responded to after other injured victims discovered on the ground floor area.

  5. Other available staff during this initial period should assist in calming residents, ensure that emergency medical service provisions are received, clear obstructions from access routes, and clean possible broken glass and/or other harmful materials.

  6. A determination should be made as to the safety of the structure itself and decide whether or not evacuation of the building is necessary. If it is determined that an evacuation must occur, notify all residents to evacuate and instruct them on where to relocate.

II. Following Immediate Inspection Period:

A. All staff should report back to the office for further assignments,

  1. The Administrator should immediately establish contact with the TODCO Emergency Operations Center via runners, walkie talkies or telephone and provide all information on casualties, fires, gas leaks, security needs and damage assessment using the Yerba Buena Neighborhood Site Emergency Report.
  2. Assist in clean-up of debris and harmful/hazardous conditions at the ground floor.
  3. At least two staff members or volunteer floor monitors should begin individual unit inspections of the non-disabled and/or frail units. The inspections should be assigned by floor to avoid duplication. The inspection itself should be limited to providing immediate assistance to injured residents, to remove harmful conditions within the unit, to provide contact with and a sense of security to the residents.
  4. Other assignments at this time may include further and more comprehensive inspections of troubled areas to be performed by the Lead Maintenance or designee. Additional first aid, assistance for troubled residents and clean-up. Volunteers should be utilized for this purpose. If they do not have first aid training they may be used by trained first aiders to assist and help ensure that residents in need remain stable.

III. After the Earthquake Inspection/Resident Assistance Period

A. The Administrator or Lead Designee should begin to prepare for the following provisions:

  1. Twenty-four (24) hours coverage if the property condition warrants.
  2. Securing additional fuel for emergency equipment if needed, water and food sources. This should be done by communicating their needs to the TODCO Emergency Command Center using the Yerba Buena Neighborhood Supply Report.
  3. Coffee, tea, water and other sources of liquid and light food items should be maintained at the front desk (throughout the disaster period).
  4. Longer term food and water sources may be provided by the American Red Cross or the Salvation Army.

SUMMARY:
The above procedures are guidelines for staff use in preparing for an actual disaster. All staff should be trained on response procedures, informed on vital property charting and charting locations. It is also important to stress that all staff are expected to report to work as regularly scheduled unless transportation or medical reasons prohibit work attendance.

It is additionally important to plan for sleeping arrangements or have cots on hand for staff that does not live on the peninsula. Staff that lives in the East Bay or Marin may not be able to return home for a period of time if the earthquake happens during regular working hours.

INDIVIDUAL EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS PLAN AFTER HOURS REPORTING TODCO/GP TODCO EMPLOYEES
Following a declared emergency in the City and County of San Francisco that affects the South of Market Neighborhood, all TODCO/GPTODCO employees will become disaster service workers.

Disaster service workers are expected to respond for duty as directed by their department procedures (this is after they have ensured the safety of their families). This guide describes the basic procedures and guidelines for TODCO/GP TODCO employees.

SHIFTS
All employees are assigned either to an "A" Shift or a "B" Shift during a full emergency. If you are assigned to the "A" Shift, your duty hours will be from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. If you are assigned to the "B" Shift, your duty hours will be from 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.

TWELVE-HOUR SHIFT ASSIGNMENTS
The key component to ensure employee readiness and the implementation of an emergency plan is preparedness.

You must be familiar with the basic plan and the specific duties of your position. Also, your family members must be familiar with the plan.

Advise your family that you may be required to work a minimum 12-hour shift following a declared emergency. Preparation should include family response plans and basic emergency items kept at home to support family needs for 72 hours.

You will be working minimum 12-hour shifts until otherwise directed.

You must ensure that hazard mitigation efforts be performed on a regular basis both at the workplace and at home.

PROCEDURES
Following a major disaster or declared state of emergency in San Francisco, such as a catastrophic earthquake, the following procedures will be implemented by all TODCO/GP TODCO employees.

IF YOU ARE AT WORK
Take appropriate action to ensure the safety and survival of co-workers, visitors and residents. Refer to your building emergency plan.

Report to your supervisor.

IF YOU ARE OUT OF THE OFFICE
Report to your office. Describe your condition and the situation (damage/injury assessment) in your immediate area. Use the most expedient means (e.g., telephone or return to office).

OFF DUTY EN ROUTE TO THE OFFICE
Continue to respond to your office by the most expedient means (e.g., car, BART MUNI, boat).

Monitor AM radio stations KNBR 680, KCBS 740 or KGO 810 for updates regarding road conditions, available transportation and waterports for transportation into the South of Market Neighborhood.

OFF DUTY: RETURNING HOME OR AT HOME
If returning home, continue on your way to ensure your family is secure.

If you are assigned to the "A" Shift and it is between 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., report to duty. If you are assigned to the "B" Shift and it is between 6:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., report to duty.

EMERGENCY COMMAND CENTER CHECKLIST
Activate Command Center, distribute job descriptions (section IV of this manual. Retrieve emergency supplies in locked cabinet below this manual and activate walkie-talkies (see section IX of this manual).

INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM ORGANIZATIONAL CHART EMBED

(Picture goes here)

DAMAGE ASSESSMENT REPORT
Surveyed by:______________________ Building:_____________________

Date:________________________ Time:____________________

Location and Description Condition
(Floor, Apartment, Hall, Community Room, Etc.) (C,D,F,L,O,W)

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

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_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

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(C) Cracks (D) Door Jam Shift (do doors open & close?)
(F) Foundation Shift (L) Leaning Walls or Structures
(O) Other (W) Windows Broken or Jammed

MISSING PERSONS REPORT
(list only those residents missing)

Report completed by:__________________ Building________________

Date:_________________________Time:_________________________

Residents name Last Known Location

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

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_________________________________________________________

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_________________________________________________________

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Comments:_______________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

DOOR HANGER SAMPLE
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YBC PLAN EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS PLAN


APPENDICES

  1. Map of Area/Disaster Relief Facilities
  2. List of Yerba Buena Plan Members
  3. Yerba Buena Neighborhood Housing
  4. San Francisco Mass Care and Casualty Care Facilities
  5. Yerba Buena Neighborhood Communication Flow Chart
  6. Yerba Buena Neighborhood Emergency Summary Report
  7. #1 Site Emergency Report
  8. #2 Site Emergency Supply Report
  9. Residential Buildings Emergency Plan Template
  10. Individual Earthquake Preparedness Plan
  11. Earthquake Preparedness Checklist
  12. Earthquake Preparedness for People with Disabilities
  13. After Hours Reporting Template
  14. Incident Command Checklist
  15. Incident Command System Organizational Chart (ICS)
  16. Damage Assessment Report
  17. Missing Persons Report
  18. Message Form
  19. Door Hanger Sample


Developed by
TODCO

Tenants and Owners Development Corporation in cooperation with the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency a community plan for disaster response Participating members: Tenants and Owners Development Corporation, Yerba Buena Consortium, Yerba Buena Consortium Earthquake Preparedness Task Force, Yerba Buena Disabled Residents Association, the Salvation Army Central Corps and Senior Activities Center, the Salvation Army Senior Meals and Nutrition Program and PREP, the South of Market Problem Solving Council, Woolf House Residence, Mendelsohn House, San Lorenzo Ruiz Center, North and South of Market Adult Day Health, South of Market Child Care, Merrill's Drug, St. Francis Place Apartments, Museum Parc, Senior Escort Service, the John Stewart Company the San Francisco Neighborhood Earthquake Preparedness Coalition, San Francisco Police Department, the San Francisco Fire Department District 3, South of Market Health Center, San Francisco City Clinic, Moscone Center, Yerba Buena Gardens Center for the Arts, San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, KTB Realty Partners, Inc., San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services and the American Red Cross Bay Area

Contact: Jim West
TODCO
(415) 896-1981



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